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Delaware Department of Education School Profile Glossary
Advanced Placement Courses (AP)
Advanced Placement courses are offered by high schools across the nation. The schools decide if they want to offer AP courses and which courses to offer. The AP curriculum is specified by the national group that operates the program and the teachers must be trained to teach these advanced courses. Students elect to participate in these more rigorous courses, courses for which many colleges grant credit if the student takes and passes the end-of-course test.
  
Average Days Present
DAILY ATTENDANCE divided by DAILY MEMBERSHIP.


- DAILY ATTENDANCE is the presence of a student on days when school is in session. A student is counted as present only when he/she is actually at school, present at another activity sponsored by the school as part of the school’s program, or personally supervised by a member of the staff. The total number of days of attendance for all students divided by the total number of school days in a given year gives the average daily attendance.


- DAILY MEMBERSHIP is the total number of school days for a given school year that a student’s name is on the current roll of a class, regardless of his/her being present or absent, is the “number of days in membership” for that student. The sum of the “number of days in membership” for all students divided by the number of school days in the school term yields the average daily membership. The final average daily membership is the total days in membership for all students over the school year divided by the number of days school was in session. Average daily membership is a more accurate count of the number of students in school than enrollment.
  
AYP Growth Model
The Growth Model assigns values to each student's progress, comparing last year's proficiency level (PL) to this year's PL. In addition, PL1 and PL2 are divided into two sections established by a table of cut scores. The Growth Model's Value Targets correspond to the percent proficient target requirements in the Original Model.
  
AYP Original Model
In order to meet the Annual Measurable Objective, each subgroup must have at least forty students in the cell to qualify. The student must also be continuously enrolled in the school for a full academic year. The targets have been set using the 2010-11 data as baseline. The targets than increase in an effort to decrease the percentage of non-proficient students by 50% over a six year period.
  
AYP Participation Rate
In order to meet participation targets, each subgroup must have 95% of eligible students tested using the DCAS in Reading, and Mathematics. An eligible student is a student who was enrolled in a school during the summative testing window for that content area. Enrollment is based on the enrollment data provided to DOE by the districts/charters on a weekly basis; entry and withdrawal dates are critical to this calculation. If the target of 95% is not met in any subgroup with 40 or more students, Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) will not be met for that year.
  
Charter School
Charter schools are independent public schools designed and operated by educators, parents, community leaders, educational entrepreneurs, and others. They are sponsored by designated local or state educational organizations, who monitor their quality and effectiveness but allow them to operate outside of the traditional system of public schools.
citation:U.S. Ed (2002). Glossary of Terms - - No Child Left Behind. Available: http://www.ed.gov/nclb/index/az/glossary.html
  
Class Size
Class size distribution is calculated differently for elementary versus high school and middle school grades:

1- For elementary school grades, the number of students per homeroom is pulled from the eSchoolPlus pupil tracking system. Grades kindergarten through third are reviewed by the district per Delaware House Bill 393, to assure they meet the appropriate student/teacher ratio.

2- For upper grades, where students may attend more than one class per day (with different student counts), the total number of classes throughout the day are used to calculate class size distribution. So if there are 8 periods, each with 4 classes running, there will be a total of 32 classes used to calculate.
  
Context Measures
The percent of students who complete education and career training beyond high school. Students who do so have a greater likelihood of future employment with higher wages.
  
Dangerous Schools
Delaware defines a school as a “Safe School” unless it has, over a three year period, five or more unsafe incidents annually for every one hundred students enrolled. If this threshold is exceeded the school will be designated as “Persistently Dangerous School”. The unsafe incidents include but are not limited to incidents that lead to suspension or expulsion for gun related violations; crimes committed on school property; and terroristic threatening.
  
District Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
The following circumstances apply to district AYP:

- For a district to be Above Target, two of the three grade-level clusters must have been rated Above, and no grade-level clusters were rated Below
- If the district has only two grade-level clusters, one must be Above for the district to be Above in AYP
- For districts with a single grade-level cluster, that cluster must be Above for the district to be Above in AYP
- These exceptions may have no Below ratings if they are to meet AYP
- If any cells require a confidence interval to meet the target, the grade cluster is rated as ‘Meets Target’
- If any cell does not meet the target after applying the confidence interval, the grade-cluster is rated as ‘Below Target’
- The combination of the Above, Meets, and Below AYP ratings for the grade-clusters will determine the district AYP rating
  
District Allocation of Current Expenses
The district allocation of current expenses by category are the categories that represent the bulk of the expenditures incurred by the school district in a given year.
  
District Rating
District accountability combines students into three component grade level clusters: Elementary (grades 3, 4, and 5), Middle (grades 6, 7, and 8), and High School (grades 9, 10, and 11). Thus, K-12 districts are treated as if they each have three schools; an elementary, a middle and a high school.

Note: a district cannot be ‘Above Target’ if Safe Harbor was needed or a confidence interval was used to attain any portion of the rating.
  
District Sources of Revenue
Districts receive revenue from three basic sources. They are funded through State, local and federal funding mechanisms. The State prioritizes capital initiatives and fund specific projects through the State's Bond Bill. The districts also receive State funding through the State's Budget Bill based primarily on the number and type of students enrolled in the district as of September 30th of the current year. Local funds are primarily received by through school districts through county tax structures. These funds are controlled through local referenda. Federal funds are received by the school districts based primarily on district wide poverty census data and the number and type of special education students.
  
Dropout Rate
The annual dropout rate is computed for all high schools. The calculation is based on students who were included in the September 30 Enrollment Report to the state. A dropout for any particular year is any student who was in the September enrollment report who did not graduate, did not die, or did not transfer to another school and was not included in the end of year enrollment report. Student who are identified as “whereabouts unknown” by a school district or charter school are assumed to be dropouts for this calculation.
  
DSSF - Academic Achievement Metric
DSSF Academic Achievement Definition:

The Academic Achievement metric area measures student performance in relation to grade-level expectations. This area includes student performance data on statewide assessments in four content areas: ELA, math, science, and social studies. The Academic Achievement metrics account for 30% of elementary and middle school performance and 25% of high school performance on the DSSF.

Term Definition(s):

Proficiency in a given subject is the percent of students who are on grade level (i.e., proficient) in said subject. Students that are on grade level (proficient) have a greater likelihood of entry and success in education and career training beyond high school.

Sources of Academic Achievement Data:

Academic Achievement data is calculated based on statewide summative assessments.

Proficiency in ELA - Smarter assessment data (grades 3-8),
SAT1 (grade 11), and DCAS-Alt1 assessment data (grades 3-8, 11)

Proficiency in Math - Smarter assessment data (grades 3-8),
SAT (grade 11), and DCAS-Alt1 assessment data (grades 3-8, 11)

Proficiency in Science - DCAS assessment data (grades 5, 8, and 10) and
DCAS-Alt1 assessment data (grades 5, 8, and 10)

Proficiency in Social Studies - DCAS assessment data (grades 4, 7 and high school ) and DCAS-Alt1 assessment data (grades 4, 7 and high school)
  
DSSF - Growth Metric
DSSF Growth Metric Definition:

The Growth area metrics measure how well schools are doing at improving student learning over time. This area includes metrics on the collective performance of students within a school as compared to students with similar assessment history in ELA and math. The Growth metrics account for 40% of elementary and middle school performance and 45% of high school performance on the DSSF.

Term Definition(s):

Growth in a given subject is the relative calculation of student progress over time as compared to their peers. The two subjects used in the Growth metric area are ELA and math.

Sources of Growth Data:

Growth data is calculated based on statewide summative assessments.


Growth in ELA - Smarter assessment (grades 3-8) or SAT (grade 11) data and up to 3 years of prior statewide summative assessment data, including DCAS.

Growth in Math - Smarter assessment (grades 3-8) or SAT (grade 11) data and up to 3 years of prior statewide summative assessment data, including DCAS.
  
DSSF - On Track to Graduation Metric
DSSF On-Track-to-Graduation Metric Definition:

The On-Track-to-Graduation area metrics aggregate student progress to and through high school graduation. The metrics in this area include information on students’ attendance and course-taking patterns as well as the extent to which students graduated from high school within a certain time frame. The On-Track-to-Graduation metrics account for 10% of elementary and middle school performance and 20% of high school performance on the DSSF.

School Level Metric Definition:

For elementary and middle schools:

Average Daily Attendance is the percent of days that students attend school. Students that attend school daily increase their likelihood of success.

For high schools:

On-Track in 9th Grade is the percent of 9th grade students earning the credits necessary to be on track to graduate from high school on time. Students who are on track at the end of 9th grade have a greater chance of completing high school on time and are less likely to drop out.

Four-Year Graduation Rate is the percent of students who graduate from high school within the traditional four-year time frame. Students that graduate from high school within four years increase their likelihood of entry and success in education and training beyond high school.

Five-Year Graduation Rate is the percent of students who graduate from high school within five years. Some students take longer than four years to graduate from high school, including students that have a specific plan to extend their high school career.

Six-Year Graduation Rate is the percent of students who graduate from high school within six years. Some students take longer than four years to graduate from high school, including students that have a specific plan to extend their high school career.
  
DSSF - Participation
Participation Definition

For a student to count as a participant in the accountability participation calculation, the student must be enrolled within the school or district for the entire test window and complete all items on the relevant statewide assessment.

A student will receive an Achievement Level (AL) or a Performance Level (PL) and Scale Score and count as a participant.
  
DSSF College and Career Preparation Metric
DSSF College and Career Preparation Metric Definition:

The College and Career Preparation metrics aggregate student preparation for education, training, and careers beyond high school. The metrics in this area include information on whether students are growing enough to be proficient in the future as well as how many students have demonstrated college and career preparation while in high school. The College and Career Preparation metrics account for 20% of elementary and middle school performance and 10% of high school performance on the DSSF.

School Level Metric Definition:

For elementary and middle schools:
Growth to Proficiency is the percent of students who are on track to be on grade level in a given content area within three years. This indicates that students are growing fast enough to meet and maintain academic success. For the Growth to Proficiency metric, the content areas used are ELA and math.


For high schools:
College and Career Preparation is the percent of students who have demonstrated preparation for education and career training after high school through Smarter, AP, IB, SAT, Career and Technical Education (CTE) pathways, and dual enrollment. Students that demonstrate early success in these areas increase their likelihood of entry and success in education and career training after high school.

  
11/24/2017 6:18:27 AM
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